MSP Logo

Municipal Services Project Blog

November 29, 2013
The task: Re-imagining public services and their meaning for the people, exposing the multiple ways of their appropriation by neoliberal forces, and suggesting possible alternatives to privatization. The international conference held in Bangalore on Oct. 24-25 provided a snapshot of significant debates.
Continue Reading
October 14, 2013
Promoting health insurance models in the name of 'universal health coverage' is not helpful and risks driving up inequality. Oxfam argues that funding health care through tax and aid is the fairest way to ensure that people receive care according to their need and contribute according to their means.
Continue Reading
May 17, 2013
As world leaders prepare to gather for the 66th World Health Assembly on May 20, social movements are questioning the market-friendly version of universal health coverage it is promoting. One organization, Jan Swasthya Abhiyan, is denouncing India’s emulation of this UHC strategy, which uncritically endorses the private medical sector and focuses on health insurance schemes.
Continue Reading
April 16, 2013
Berliner Energietisch is organizing a referendum initiative to remunicipalize the electricity grid and create a public, democratic energy utility in Berlin, Germany. Its slogan “ecological-social-democratic” names the three key principles behind the campaign to buy back the city’s electricity grid from the current owner, a subsidiary of Swedish corporatized public energy company Vattenfall.
Continue Reading
March 3, 2013
Almost a year has now passed since our book on water remunicipalisation was first released. It is exciting to give it a second life today, in Spanish, as well as through a short animation film. The remunicipalisation wave continues and it must serve to democratize water services.
Continue Reading
January 31, 2013
How can social movements navigate diversity and effectively demand quality public services for all? And how can they do so in a way that genuinely reflects the concerns of all those whose voices give them strength? Today activists and trade unionists in Cape Town see the need for solid research and knowledge exchange on organizing and movement building in the face water cut-offs, rising unemployment and falling wages.
Continue Reading
December 17, 2012
There is a lot of talk about crisis these days. It can hide the reality of winners and losers from current global processes and the fact that having a healthy society is a matter of choice. EQUINET’s 2012 Regional Equity Watch shows how health inequalities have persisted despite economic growth, leaving millions without the basic food, water, shelter, employment and income to lead a healthy life. But emerging alternatives point to the possible.
Continue Reading
November 8, 2012
Although Chávez and Morales tend to grab the headlines in Latin America as stars of the New Left, the Frente Amplio government in Uruguay has been quietly working away building some of the most effective public services in the world. A conference on the topic of ‘public enterprises’ was held in Montevideo last week, hosted in part by the state-owned companies for water, electricity, railways, telecoms and gas. It gathered an eclectic mix of men in suits, but their commitment to publicly owned services that take equity and universality seriously was impressive.
Continue Reading
October 25, 2012
We are sitting in a large Catholic hall nestled in the heart of Mexico City, the type of space where many Latin American social movements have historically sought refuge from dictatorships. Today, we are not fending off the military but big multinationals and our governments who want to sell our water, use it to grow soy or poison it with their mines. We have gathered for the general assembly of Red Vida, forty of us, debating political strategy to build on our successes against water privatization in Latin America.
Continue Reading
October 11, 2012
The July 2012 release of the Indian government’s draft strategy for universal health coverage has generated intense debate, with civil society groups such as Jan Swasthya Abhiyan (PHM) and even the Ministry of Health expressing their opposition to its main thrust. The debate still rages, and there is news of yet a third version in as many months. In a nutshell, what has been decried is how it would create health ‘consumers’, neglect equity goals, limit the “package” of services offered and fall short of committing to much-needed investments.
Continue Reading

Pages